• Categories

  • Archives

  • Join Bangladesh Army

    "Ever High Is My Head" Please click on the image

  • Join Bangladesh Navy

    "In War & Peace Invincible At Sea" Please click on the image

  • Join Bangladesh Air Force

    "The Sky of Bangladesh Will Be Kept Free" Please click on the image

  • Blog Stats

    • 314,020 hits
  • Get Email Updates

  • Like Our Facebook Page

  • Visitors Location

    Map
  • Hot Categories

Nobel Prize For Rabindranath Tagore In 1913- Some Untold Stories

https://i0.wp.com/topnews.in/files/Rabindranath-Tagore_0.jpg

Rabindranth Tagore was not the recommendation of the Nobel Committee

Rabindranath Tagore was the greatest of all great Bengali writers. But it is sad to note that the learned Bengali readers and writers kept many facts about Tagore’s winning of Nobel Prize in 1913 are kept secret. Some such facts are given below:

A. Rabindranath Tagore was more than many Nobel Laureates. But his winning of the Nobel Prize was a political consolation for the Hindu terrorist movements launched in Bengal in the early days of the 20th century.

B. Rabindranth Tagore was not the recommendation of the Nobel Committee. The Nobel Committee named somebody else. The name of Rabindranath Tagore was not even in the short list of the Nobel Committee.

C. Rabindranth Tagore was awarded the Nobel Prize neither as a Bengalee nor as an Indian. He was awarded the prize as an “Anglo-Indian”.

D. Rabindranth Tagore never made any so-called prize receiving speech.

E. Rabindranth Tagore only sent a two line prize acceptance message.

F. The prize was accepted by the British Ambassador and it was delivered to the poet in Calcutta.

G. It appears from the information, now available, that Rabindranath Tagore was awarded Nobel Prize in consideration of his successful attempt to intermingle the Western Christian-Hindu philosophy.

I shall very much welcome exact and objective reply from the esteemed readers of this Group.

I have been planning to publish a very small book on the subject: Nobel Prize for Rabindranath Tagore in 1913: some untold stories. All the points raised in my message are based on facts. But I would like to get more information on the subject. Help from others will greatly help in the publication of the book with more information.

However, for the information of all concerned, I would like to point out that Rabindranath was a Brahmo ( a reformed group of Brahmins of the so-called Hindu community of India).

The word ‘Hindu’ never existed to identify any religion before the emergence of the British Raj in India. It was invented by Raja Ram Mohan Roy in collaboration with the British colonial rulers. This the Britishers did with a view to getting the united massive force together against the defeated Muslim rulers of the then India.

As such, until the early last century, we find that 99% civil servants, lawyers, judges, engineers, doctors, professors etc. under the British Raj in India were from the Hindu community only. The fourth class employees like peons, messengers, bearers or guards are not included.

Brahmos allowed the conversion of even the low caste Sudras. But in fact, all Brahmos were Hindus. This was well understood by the British Rulers of India.

Rabindranath Tagore was not very vast in literary productions in the first decade of the last century. In fact, excepting the limited 250-copy English edition of Gitanjali, hardly there was any English version of Rabindranath Tagore’s other books. Not to speak of any Asian, until 1913 even any American was not awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

https://i1.wp.com/www.artoflegendindia.com/images/detailed/peaf004_raja_ram_mohan_roy.jpg

The word ‘Hindu’ was invented by Raja Ram Mohan Roy in collaboration with the British colonial rulers.

Rabindranath Tagore was in the spiritual lineage of Raja Ram Mohan Roy, Swami Vivekananda, Ramakrishna and others. In the lyrical lineage he was obviously reflecting D.L. Roy, Lalon Fakir, Atul Prasad Sen and others.

Rabindranath Tagore was a pro-British wealthy successor to the vast property left by his grand father Dwarakanath Tagore. In the first decade of the 20th Century he was the leading-most Bengalee intellectual friend of the British Rulers in India.

https://i2.wp.com/www.liveindia.com/freedomfighters/khudiram.jpg
Had there been no Khudiram Bose or ‘Terrorist Movement’, perhaps there would have been no Nobel Prize for Rabindranath Tagore

During the last decades of the 19th century and in the early 20th century there were popular uprisings, known as the ‘Terroist Movement’ in Bengal. Khudiram Bose was young recruit by such leaders of ‘Terroist Movement’ in Bengal. The British Rulers were very much disturbed by the widespread activities of the volunteers of ‘Terroist Movement’. They needed to pacify the Bengalees. Nobel Prize for Rabindranath Tagore was an attempt in that direction.

https://i0.wp.com/www.4to40.com/images/legends/hargobindkhorana/nobel_prize.jpg

Rabindranath Tagore's Nobel Prize Medal

Rabindranath Tagore was not known to the West in the first decade of the 20th century; hardly any body could have had access to his English edition of Gitanjali; this is obvious from the fact that Rabindranath Tagore was named in the short list of the Nobel Committee for the award of the Nobel Prize for literature in 1913. It was said that Rabindranath Tagore was known to the Swedish Academy as an ‘Anglo-Indian poet’ and not either as an Indian or as a Bengalee.

In addition, Rabindranath Tagore did not visit Sweden or Norway before or after being awarded the Nobel Prize. The British Ambassador received the prize for and on behalf of Rabindranath Tagore and it was confidentially delivered to Rabindranath Tagore at his Jorasanko residence in Calcutta.
Had there been no Khudiram Bose or ‘Terrorist Movement’, perhaps there would have been no Nobel Prize for Rabindranath Tagore. Even hundreds of Gitanjali could never open the passage of Nobel Prize for Rabindranath Tagore for Literature in 1913.

Of course, the high diplomatic circles and political decision makers in London did not like to take any risk and responsibilities and they decided, more or less during the same period, to shift the capital of the British Raj from Calcutta to New Delhi in 1911.

A.B.M. Shamsud Doulah
(Advocate, Supreme Court of Bangladesh &
formerly Assistant Professor of English in
Jagannath College, Dhaka)
P.O. 351, Dhaka-1000
BANGLADESH

Email: shamsuddoulah@yahoo.com

Book Review : Origins of the Bangladesh Army

Title : ORIGINS OF THE BANGLADESH ARMY

Author : Sabir Abdus Samee

Category : New (Academic)

First Published : May 2010

Publishers : Bornali Book Center

Type of book : Historical / Political / Military History

General Subject Matter : History of the Bangladesh Army

Price : Taka 120.00

ISBN : 978-984-645-056-9

This is the first book on the history of the Bangladesh Army. If you are interested about Bangladeshi history, politics and Bangladesh Army, you will enjoy this book.

“Origins of the Bangladesh Army” is available in the following places:

Boi Bichitra
House No- 141, Road-12,
Block-E, Banani
Dhaka

Boi Bichitra
Rupayon Golden Age
Gulshan-2
Dhaka

Shotabdi
Prokashoni
491/1 Mogbazar, Wireless Rail Gate
Dhaka-1217

You can ask any salesperson to give you a copy, if you do not find the book in display.

If you have any problem in finding the book, you can contact the author at sabir_samee@yahoo.co.uk

Book Review

http://www.botomul.com/ad_file/ad_file~2112.jpg

Origins of the Bangladesh Army by Sabir Abdus Samee

Amalia Macris

Sabir Abdus Samee’s work Origins of the Bangladesh Army brings a new take on historical and political events, as seen through his eyes and interpreted by him. As the son of a Bangladeshi army officer, he spent his childhood in Bangladeshi cantonments. It is clearly a topic close to his heart that he has tried to bring more light to for outsiders.

The book is divided into five chronological parts starting from 1757 with the Legacy left from the British Raj, followed by the Pakistani years (1947 – 1971) and the war of Independence which took place in 1971 and saw the foundation of the Bangladesh Army. The book continues with the subsequent victory that came in the same year and ends with the Bangladesh Army after Independence (1972 to present). Through this account the author has tried to bring out the truth and challenge views of intellectuals and politicians regarding the Bangladesh Army. Full of references to other sources and quotes from politicians and Army Officials that add colour and dimension to the text Origins of the Bangladesh Army tells the story of those who fought for the Army, those who were sacrificed and those who were victorious. The role of the Bangladeshi media is also analysed in this book, examining the political affiliations of each source and their portrayal of events.

This is a book suitable for anyone who has an interest in military books and reading about historical facts, or for someone carrying out research on the history of Bangladesh to present date. Books on the topic do exist but a Western point of view is often presented, it is therefore interesting and useful to have a book in English giving a Bangladeshi’s perspective of events.

Amalia Macris is a Communication Consultant and Writer. She lives in Cyprus.

You can reach the Author at :

BANGLADESH ARMY (FaceBook)


%d bloggers like this: