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How To Detect A 2-Way Mirror?

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When we visit toilets, bathrooms, hotel rooms, changing rooms, etc., How many of you know for sure that the seemingly ordinary mirror hanging on the wall is a real mirror, or actually a 2-way mirror I.e., they can see you, but you can’t see them. There have been many cases of people installing 2-way mirrors in female changing rooms or bathroom or bedrooms.

It is very difficult to positively identify the surface by just looking at it. So, how do we determine with any amount of certainty what type of Mirror we are looking at?

Conduct This Simple Test:

Place the tip of your fingernail against the reflective surface and if there is a GAP between your fingernail and the image of the nail, then it is a GENUINE mirror.

However, if your fingernail DIRECTLY TOUCHES the image of your nail, then BEWARE, IT IS A 2-WAY MIRROR! (There may be someone seeing you from the other side). So remember, every time you see a mirror, do the “fingernail test.” It doesn’t cost you anything. It is simple to do.

This is a really good thing to do. The reason there is a gap on a real mirror, is because the silver is on the back of the mirror UNDER the glass.

Whereas with a two-way mirror, the silver is on the surface. Keep it in mind! Make sure and check every time you enter in hotel rooms.

Share this with your sisters, wife, daughters, friends, colleagues, etc.

Pass this message to all your friends in the Contacts.

How to Detect Hidden Camera in Trial Room?

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Step 1: In front of the trial room take your mobile and make sure that mobile can make calls.

Step 2: Then enter into the trail room, take your mobile and make a call!

If u can’t make a call……!!!! There is a hidden camera……

This is due to the interference of fiber optic cable during the signal transfer.

Please forward this to your friends to educate this issue to the public. To prevent our innocent ladies from HIDDEN CAMERA………..

Britain’s Biggest Ever Traitor

Red Sonia, Christine Keeler And The Final, Damning Evidence

By Chapman Pincher

Spy: Chapman Pincher is convinced that Roger Hollis had connections with the Soviet secret services

Espionage never ceases, and that applies with particular force to the Russians, whose activities are now almost back to Cold War levels.

While MI5 concentrates on countering terrorism, the Russian intelligence services have increased the number of officers posing as diplomats and trade officials in London, with others in hidden roles.

191: Russia's SVR/FSB/GRU Intelligence: An Introduction to Today's Russian Intelligence and Counterintelligence Operations and Methodologies

Russia's SVR/FSB/GRU Intelligence

Russian bombers are once again probing UK air space. Russian nuclear submarines are testing our sonar defences. The murder of the dissident Russian Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006 suggests that the FSB, the successor to the KGB, is still prepared to indulge in assassination.

In this context, the long decades of betrayal by otherwise respectable Britons, and the appalling penetration by Soviet ‘moles’ of our security services before, during and after the Second World War, expose lessons that must be learnt and applied in the immediate future.

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Their treachery not only threatened British and American forces but placed the whole free world in jeopardy during the Cold War that followed.

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Could ineptitude on such a scale by the British security service be due entirely to incompetence? Or was there at least one longserving penetration agent  –  a ‘supermole’  –  inside MI5, not only supplying the Kremlin with British and American defence and intelligence secrets but also protecting its other spies and agents, whenever practicable, by preventing effective action against them?

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Kremlin

The responsible authorities have consistently ensured that the full truth is withheld. But if one imagines a magic compass that could be placed over any suspicious set of circumstances affecting MI5’s counter-measures to the Soviet intelligence assault, the needle almost invariably points to the man who served in the agency for 27 years and became its chief.

The serial culpability of Roger Hollis for security disasters can no longer be in doubt.

There was little attention paid in this country when, late in September 2000, Vladimir Putin, President of the Russian Federation, awarded the posthumous title ‘Super-agent of Military Intelligence’ to Ursula Beurton, a former British housewife. But the tribute from Putin drew attention to a dark corner of British espionage history that is still the cause of dispute and controversy today.

It was an unprecedented honour for a woman who had already held two Orders of the Red Banner for her activities in several countries, especially in Britain. Here, she is better known by her Soviet code name, Sonia.

Sixties scandal: Hollis learnt of the affair between John Profumo - pictured with his wife Valerie - and Christina Keeler many months before it became public - yet he chose not to warn ministers

Sixties scandal: Hollis learnt of the affair between John Profumo – pictured with his wife Valerie – and Christina Keeler many months before it became public – yet he chose not to warn ministers

For some reason, neither Sonia’s name nor her deeds are mentioned in the recently published The Defence Of The Realm: The Authorised History Of MI5. Yet between 1941 and 1950, Ursula Beurton, who had posed as a German refugee, had been a prime mover in the theft of British and American atomic bomb secrets, passing them directly to her handlers in the Red Army intelligence service, the GRU.

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The Red Army

Late one September night in 1943, she pulled off her most astonishing coup of all from a simple cottage in Oxford. Having taken her miniature high-tech radio transmitter from a cavity in the stone wall of the garden, Sonia, then 36, sat at a kitchen table downstairs. She had laboriously converted the document she had acquired, letter by letter, into code. Then, having rechecked it, she began to tap out her signal in Morse.

The tall aerial she had strung up with the permission of the owner of the house next door  –  ostensibly to serve her large conventional radio set  –  ensured that her efforts reached the Kremlin, where Stalin himself quickly rated her intelligence as of the greatest value.

For the first time, the Russian leadership knew that the US and Great Britain were creating an atomic military alliance  –  and that they were going to hide it from the Soviets, their wartime ally.

The document she transmitted was the top-secret Quebec Agreement between Churchill and Roosevelt, confirming their intention to go into nuclear partnership. It had been signed only 16 days beforehand, with circulation restricted to the very highest chiefs of staff.

Red Sonia: Christine Keeler was also seeing Russian spy Eugene Ivanov at the same time as she was seeing British MP John Profumo

Red Sonia: Christine Keeler was also seeing Russian spy Eugene Ivanov at the same time as she was seeing British MP John Profumo

It is almost inconceivable that Sonia could have achieved this and other spying triumphs without the aid of a senior figure within MI5 itself: tantalising proof that she had a high-level British protector whose name has been withheld to this day by the Russian authorities.

The strangely intertwined careers of Ursula Beurton and Roger Hollis, the failed student who rose to become head of British counter-intelligence, merit more than mere suspicion.

Even by conventional standards, Hollis had a far from unblemished record. From the Forties to the Sixties, the security services were hit with a series of disasters, from the case of the atomic traitor Klaus Fuchs, to the security catastrophe that was the Profumo scandal, and the defections of Donald Maclean, Guy Burgess and Kim Philby, all of whom escaped to the Eastern Bloc with ease.

Throughout this period, the methods used by Hollis and his curious unwillingness to take action were the cause of consternation among many of his colleagues. The serial failings seemed to indicate that deep within the service there was an active Soviet mole who was aiding Russia and hindering Britain.

Even today, thanks to the help of the Russian historian Dr Svetlana Chervonnaya, I am unearthing fresh revelations. We can now prove, for example, that such a double agent did indeed exist. Intelligence messages and a crucial Russian document provided by the former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev showed that a GRU agent codenamed Elli worked inside British intelligence.

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We can demonstrate that, despite claims to the contrary, Hollis was in charge of Soviet counter-espionage during the Second World War, while the steady release of material from secret Soviet archives is revealing a staggering scale of wartime penetration by Soviet agents. It was thanks in part to a level of competition between the KGB and GUR  –  each running its own spy network  –  that has not until now been understood.

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GRU

All of these new findings accord with the guilt of Roger Hollis.

The first clue to the existence of a highly placed Soviet agent was provided in 1945 by a 26-year-old Red Army cipher clerk called Igor Gouzenko who was posted to Canada.

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Red Army cipher clerk Igor Gouzenko

Hating the thought of returning to Moscow, he defected. Under questioning, and in the course of exposing many Canadians, he also revealed he had seen evidence that Moscow ‘had an inside track in MI5’.

He also knew that the code-name of that mole was Elli.

During the course of the wartime period in which Gouzenko was party to Elli messages, there was only one member of MI5 who had access to the relevant files.

This was Roger Hollis, the officer in charge of Soviet counter-espionage, then based at MI5’s wartime HQ in the requisitioned Blenheim Palace.

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MI5

The possibility of Hollis being ‘Elli’ was truly frightening, because he remained in MI5 for 27 years, heading it for nine. An MI5 chief who was a Soviet agent would have been privy to almost every state secret, including details of preparations for war.

Many find it hard to believe that Hollis, who was the son of a bishop, could have become a Soviet agent. Born in Wells in 1905, as a teenager Hollis was an assiduous worker. But he led a rumbustious life at Oxford, drinking heavily, and he left the university before taking his degree. Later, he would say he left Oxford of his own choice, but he never gave a satisfactory explanation of why his next move was to seek his fortune in China.

He travelled to Shanghai in 1927 and got a job with the British American Tobacco company. The city was teeming with agents, including many working for the Soviets.

Spy master: Roger Hollis, pictured with his second wife Val after he retired, is Britain's biggest ever traitor, according to Pincher

Spy master: Roger Hollis, pictured with his second wife Val after he retired, is Britain’s biggest ever traitor, according to Pincher

A couple of years later, a 23-yearold slim, dark-haired German girl called Ursula Hamburger arrived in Shanghai, where she was drafted into the network of the local GUR recruiter and given the code name Sonia. She underwent six months of training in wireless telegraphy, including the construction of clandestine transmitters and micro-photography. When qualified, this exceptionally able young woman was told that she was now with the Red Army and had been awarded the rank of captain. She was told that ‘much lay ahead for her’.

It seems likely that Hollis and Sonia met. Hollis became friends with a German man, Arthur Ewert, who was in turn a close friend of Sonia. According to a document seen by a Moscow intelligence source, Sonia later alerted her superiors about the ‘ripeness of Hollis for recruitment’.

Hollis returned to England in 1934 without a job. He failed to get a post with The Times  –  traditionally a recruiting ground for the British security services  –  but through his new wife, Eve Swayne, he met contacts who introduced him to recruiters for MI5.

Hollis remained silent about his past associations with communist friends. Positive vetting did not exist at that time; a ‘good background’ was considered sufficient. He swiftly rose through the ranks and, during the Second World War, found himself in charge of countering Soviet espionage.

Sonia, too, was prospering. Stationed in Switzerland in the late Thirties, she received instructions to secure British nationality by divorcing her husband and marrying one of her English recruits. She did not demur. She applied for a British passport on March 11, 1940, and posed as a Jewish German refugee, stating that she was fearful that Switzerland would be invaded.

Her orders were to establish herself in Oxford. This was just weeks after MI5 had been moved out of London to Blenheim, nine miles away from Oxford.

Official documents have since revealed that certain MI5 officers realised at the time that Sonia’s marriage had been one of convenience to secure nationality and that there was further cause for suspicion as her new husband was himself suspected of espionage. Despite this, Hollis’s supporters have claimed that he could not be blamed for failing to detect her activities, virtually under his nose at Blenheim, because he did not know that she was there.

During the years of her eventual safe retirement in East Germany  –  she slipped out of Britain in 1950  –  Sonia claimed that she came to believe that someone in MI5 had been protecting her.

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Dr Klaus Fuchs

Another memorable figure in the troubled history of the intelligence service was Dr Klaus Fuchs, head of the Department of Theoretical Physics at the atomic energy research establishment based in the village of Harwell, again near Oxford.

Fuchs, another German refugee, had been cleared to work by Hollis and a colleague in 1941, despite warnings from another MI5 officer that Fuchs was ‘very well known in communist circles’. The officer declared: ‘Perhaps, it would be as well to warn the Ministry of Atomic Production of this man’s connections.’

Nothing was done by Hollis, whose inaction in such circumstances was to become his trademark.
Fuchs went on to establish contact with Sonia. It was to her that he passed details of the atomic bomb, on the platform at Banbury station. He gave her more than 100 pages of drawings and formulae.

In one respect, at least, it is a surprise that she could get the information out of Britain. The Radio Security Service had been established to ‘intercept illicit transmissions’ by enemy agents. Illegal transmissions were indeed detected in the Oxford area. MI5 was alerted. But no action was taken.

The day that Sonia transmitted the information  –  September 4  –  was a day when it was highly likely that Hollis was in the Blenheim and Oxford area, vetting scientists for dispatch to America. Indeed, Hollis was in charge of vetting Klaus Fuchs for such a transfer across the Atlantic.

Calamitously, he reported that the scientist was politically inactive and there were no security objections to him.

Not what it seems: 'Buster' Crabb vanished during a reconnaissance mission around a Soviet cruiser in 1956 - fuelling suspicion that the Soviet naval ranks had been tipped off

Not what it seems: ‘Buster’ Crabb vanished during a reconnaissance mission around a Soviet cruiser in 1956 – fuelling suspicion that the Soviet naval ranks had been tipped off

Hollis’s strangely passive understanding of his role in counterespionage was summed up by fellow officer Guy Lidell, who wrote: ‘Roger’s view is that the country is full of evilly intentioned persons but there is no necessity to drag them out of their holes. They had much better be left to rot in obscurity.’

This might explain the level of Soviet penetration. Fresh examples continue to emerge. I can reveal that the combined researches of Dr Chervonnaya and myself have identified James MacGibbon, a well-known figure in the publishing world, as a ‘super agent’ known as Milord, who supplied the Russian Embassy with copious material garnered from the MI6 interception centre at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire.

Milord, who worked in the War Office, stole so much information derived from secret German radio messages that at one point it was proposed that he fill a diplomatic bag with the transcripts. MacGibbon was given the Order of Lenin, one of the highest Soviet honours. But he died in respectability aged 88, his neighbours none the wiser.

Despite a confession, released after his death, the MacGibbon case was entirely ignored in The Authorised History Of MI5.

By 1956, Roger Hollis had risen to become head of MI5. These were difficult years for the service.

The war had seen great intelligence successes against the Nazis, the years after were disastrous.

The ‘Buster’ Crabb case was yet another cause of embarrassment
and suspicion. In 1956, Russian ships arrived in Portsmouth for a diplomatic conference. Both MI5 and MI6 felt that a diver should investigate the underside of the vessels to see how they might be detected by submarines.

Prime Minister Anthony Eden specifically forbade any such action but the agency chiefs  –  and Hollis was among them  –  sent in a trained frogman, Commander Lionel Crabb, known as ‘Buster’, who died in circumstances that remain a matter of claim and counterclaim.

Many speculated he was killed by Russian divers. A still-secret report of an Admiralty Board of Inquiry concluded that due to strong tides and being weighted, he became trapped in the underwater timbers of a jetty and had run out of air.

A shabby cover-up followed, placing full responsibility on the dead man’s shoulders. But the possibility that Crabb’s underwater mission had been betrayed in advance was strengthened in the early Sixties when the KGB defector Anatoli Golitsin volunteered information that Soviet naval intelligence had been warned.

Hollis’s baffling oversights reached an especially curious point during the Profumo scandal, which led to the fall of the Conservative Government and the installation of a Labour administration more acceptable to the Soviet Union.

Defence Minister John Profumo, then 48, met 19-year-old Christine Keeler at Cliveden in 1961 and began an affair. But she was also seeing Soviet attache Eugene Ivanov  –  a spy. The US was then planning to supply West Germany with a new medium-range missile. Ivanov wanted details.

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Russian spy Eugene Ivanov

Christine Keeler later stated that Ivanov had asked her directly to ‘obtain from Profumo the date of delivery of nuclear warheads to Germany’.

Hollis was apprised of her long sexual affair with Profumo and of her association with Ivanov. He could not have failed to appreciate the threat to the Government. But for five months he failed to warn the Prime Minister.

Treachery: Ursula Beurton, one half of the husband and wife team who were key figures in the Soviet ROTE DREI spy ring

Treachery: Ursula Beurton, one half of the husband and wife team who were key figures in the Soviet ROTE DREI spy ring

One MI5 officer warned Hollis in writing: ‘If, in any subsequent inquiries, we were found to have been in possession of this information about Profumo and taken no action on it, we would, I am sure, be subject to much criticism for failing to bring it to light. I suggest that this information be passed to the Prime Minister.’ Hollis responded to this advice by repeating his order that no further action was to be taken. He particularly forbade any attempt to interview Keeler.

Profumo finally made a statement to Parliament, claiming  –  fatally  –  that there had been ‘no impropriety whatsoever’ and his resignation followed. For months Hollis had kept Ivanov’s interest in the atomic matter from the eyes of all Ministers, including the Home Secretary.

In Parliament, Macmillan declared MI5 had kept him ignorant about the relationship between Profumo and Keeler and of her being asked to discover the nuclear weapons date. He threw himself on the sympathy of the House, but left the Chamber crestfallen and dispirited. In 1963, stricken with health problems, he resigned. Both he and Harold Wilson were later convinced the Profumo affair had decided the following year’s election.

Retirement came for Hollis in 1965, at a point when many colleagues as well as senior figures in the CIA were questioning  –  at the very least  –  his competence. He died in 1973, aged 68.

There is an intriguing postscript. A few years ago, I received a brief note from a Michael J. Butt: ‘If you should require further information relating to Roger Hollis, you can contact me.’

Born in 1936, Butt joined the Communist Party in 1960. A fellow member asked if Butt would like to take over his bedsit in North London. It was in a house of a dedicated communist known as Comrade Bridget. Butt moved in and found, as his room was at the front of the house, that he was required to answer the door to callers.

As many of the visitors were well-known communists, he was proud to answer that door. He came to feel he was rubbing shoulders with luminaries. He told me that  –  with one exception  –  all the callers whom he did not know tended to give their names before he let them in. The exception was a slim, round-shouldered, clean-shaven tallish man who wore dark clothes and a large black hat on his rare visits.

Whenever this man visited, Bridget had warned him saying: ‘Someone will be calling tonight.’ The visitor was always alone. The mystery man would say nothing other than ‘good evening’ before proceeding to Bridget’s room.

Butt did not discover the identity of the man until he found my book Too Secret Too Long, which contained rare pictures of Sir Roger Hollis. Photographs of Hollis had not previously been published, as befitted his position as head of MI5. Butt, however, insisted that he was ‘very recognisable’ from the book. I was also astonished to learn that Comrade Bridget was in fact Sonia’s sister. Bridget, too, remained unquestioned by MI5.

Hollis would have been at virtually no risk of being spotted. In those days, the MI5 chief did not have a bodyguard. He also knew that his identity was so secret that no ordinary citizen would recognise him.

Butt had a souvenir too: in 1961, Bridget, in a state of some panic, gave him a compact case containing a Russian-made device that he thought might be a photographic enlarger. She wanted it out of the house.

This was at the time when Ruislip-based Russian spies Peter and Helen Kroger were unmasked, trapped by a Russian-made transmitter. I subsequently found that Butt’s souvenir was indeed a portable enlarger for a darkroom, adapted to enlarge the tiny photographs taken by a Minox espionage camera.

Of course, you will not read about this in The Authorised History Of MI5, which comes illustrated on the front with MI5’s official badge and its motto Regnum Defende  –  The Defence Of The Realm. It has long been said that ‘Rectum Defende’ would be a more effective motto

Treachery, by Chapman Pincher, is published by Mainstream, priced £25. To order a copy at the special price of £18.99 with free p&p, call the Review Bookstore on 08 5 155 0713 or visit MailLife.co.uk/books

Source :

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CIA opens the file on the secret world of toenail messages

A formula for invisible ink used by spies during the First World War and espionage techniques involving messages etched on toenails are among classified documents released by the CIA.

Six of the oldest files held by the agency, which predate it by several decades, were made public this week.

One paper from 1918 lists the chemicals and techniques used to create “secret writing”. Another from 1914 and written in French gives the formula the Germans were believed to have used for their invisible ink.

“When historical information is no longer sensitive, we take seriously our responsibility to share it with the American people,” said Leon Panetta, the CIA director.

The documents, which were originally kept by the Office of Naval Intelligence before even the Office of Strategic Services, the CIA’s predecessor, was established, offer a fascinating glimpse into spycraft from another age.

Some handwritten, they reveal chemical methods used by intelligence agents to open sealed envelopes without being detected and carry warnings such as:

“Do not inhale fumes.”

The papers give a glimpse into a secretive wartime world. One suggests that messages should be passed by soaking a handkerchief or collar in a mixture of nitrate, soda and starch and then drying the fabric. The chemicals would come out when the cloth was put in water and that liquid would become invisible ink for message writing. The person receiving the message could then read the words by applying iodide of potassium.

Some 50 scenarios for using the ink were suggested, including “placing writings under postage stamps, wrapping messages in medicine capsules and engraving messages on toenails”.

A chemist who provided some of the chemicals warned that the ink might be toxic enough to corrode a steel pen and advised that a quill be used instead.

Steve Aftergood, of the Federation of American Scientists, was unimpressed by the CIA’s “openness”. “Invisible ink was rendered obsolete by digital encryption long ago,” he said.

Invisible ink – How starch helped secrets disappear

1. Put a tablespoon of starch into a tumbler of water and boil it. Allow the water to cool and then add 10 grams of nitrite of soda, a lawn fertilizer available in garden centres.

2. Soak a handkerchief or starched shirt collar and allow it to dry.

3. Add the material to water and the chemicals will be released, creating invisible ink. Write a message with it, ideally with a quill.

4. The person who receives the message should apply iodide of potassium, used in disinfectants and chemical hair treatments, to make it visible.

Tools of Tradecraft: The CIA’s Historic Spy Kit

Whenever James Bond needed a nifty device to snap a surreptitious surveillance picture or escape the gilded clutches of Auric Goldfinger, he could count on the ingenious minds in the Secret Service’s Q Division to devise a solution. Real-world Bonds working for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, and its precursor the Office of Strategic Services, could turn to the Office of Research and Development for similar tradecraft tools.

From mosquito drones to couture cameras, the CIA had its agents’ needs covered. Some of these devices are now displayed in the CIA’s museum, located at the agency’s Langley, Virginia, headquarters.

Although the museum is not open to the public, recently the CIA launched a Flickr stream with images of some of its declassified historic spy tools. Here’s a few of the best from the collection, even if our own Danger Room was a bit disappointed by the CIA’s choices.Above:

“Belly Buster” Hand-Crank Audio Drill

The CIA used the “Belly Buster” drill during the late 1950s and early 1960s to drill holes into masonry in order to implant listening devices. After assembly, the base of the drill was held firmly against the stomach, while the handle was cranked manually. The kit came with several drill bits and accessories.

 

Letter Remover

 

Letter Remover

Special devices were used in World War II to retrieve letters from envelopes without disturbing their seals. The pincer-like device was inserted into the unsealed gap at the top of the envelope flap, then turned to wind up the letter and extract it from the envelope.

 

Letter Remover

 

Letter Remover

Here’s a view showing the letter rolled up around the pincer for easy removal from the envelope.

 

Stereoscope and Case

 

Stereoscope and Case

The stereoscope, used during World War II, helped Allied photo analyzers examine images of enemy territory taken by airplane-mounted cameras. It allowed them to view the film in 3-D.

 

Dragonfly Insectothopter

 

Dragonfly Insectothopter

Developed by the CIA’s Office of Research and Development in the 1970s, this micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was the first insect-sized aerial vehicle (Insectothopter) developed to explore intelligence collection via miniature devices.

 

CIA Semi-Submersible

 

CIA Semi-Submersible

The CIA designed this two-man semi-submersible in the 1950s. It carried no weapons, provided cramped quarters, and required a “mother ship” for transport and recovery, but it could slip into regions that normal ships could not.

 

Microdot Camera

 

Microdot Camera

Transferring secret documents during the Cold War was aided by this microdot camera that could photograph and reduce whole pages of information onto a tiny piece of film the size of a sentence period. The film could then be embedded into otherwise banal correspondence as punctuation at the end of a sentence. Microdots were also hidden in rings, hollow coins and other items. The recipient would read the microdot with a special viewer.

 

 

“Matchbox” Camera

The Eastman Kodak Company developed and manufactured this camera for the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). Made in the shape of matchboxes that were used at the time, it could be disguised by adding matchbox labels in various languages and styles that were relevant to the country in which it was to be used.

 

Single-Use Encoder Pads

 

Single-Use Encoder Pads

One-time pads (OTP) were issued in matching sets of two for encoding: one set was for the encoder and one for the decoder. No two pages were alike. Each sheet contained a random key in the form of five-digit groups. Once a sheet was used to encode a message, it was torn off the pad and destroyed. Because the codes were used only once, they were virtually unbreakable.

 

“Dead” Drop Spike

 

“Dead” Drop Spike

Used to facilitate secure communication between an agent and his/her handler, the spike, containing documents or film, could be pushed into the ground by the agent at a pre-arranged spot and later retrieved by a handler.

 

M-209 Cipher Box

 

M-209 Cipher Box

A mechanical cipher device designed by Boris Hagelin that was widely used by the U.S. Army during World War II. Compact and portable, it used a series of rotors to encode and decode secret military messages.

 

Pigeon Camera

 

Pigeon Camera

The CIA’s Office of Research and Development created this camera that was small and light enough to be fitted to a pigeon. Photos taken from the bird in flight could be captured within hundreds of feet of the target, producing much more detailed pictures than other image-capturing methods.

 

Surveillance Fashion

 

Surveillance Fashion

For the female mole attending a black-tie affair, surveillance equipment didn’t have to be dowdy. This “couture” outfit from the Office of Technical Readiness allowed spies to munch on canapes and dance a waltz while still snapping surreptitious pics and recording cocktail chatter.

 

Code in a Compact

 

Code in a Compact

A female agent could powder her nose while sneaking a surreptitious peak at code hidden in the mirror of this handy dual-use compact. When tipped at a certain angle, the code was visible in the mirror.

 

Escape Map

 

Escape Map

Printed on silk, this escape map could be folded compactly for concealment (or worn smartly as a scarf) and wouldn’t rustle when opened and closed. It was printed with waterproof dyes so the colors wouldn’t run if an agent had to make a sudden water-borne escape.

 

A-12 Spurs

 

A-12 Spurs

These “spurs,” worn on airplanes, strapped over boot heels and were each attached to a ball connected to a cable beneath the plane seat. If the pilot had to pull the “D” ring (ejection handle) in an emergency, the cables would snap the wearer’s feet back under the seat to ensure a smooth and safe ejection from the aircraft.

 

Silver Dollar Concealer

 

Silver Dollar Concealer

This Eisenhower silver dollar, hollow on the inside, could be used to conceal messages or film.

 

Silver Dollar Concealer Interior

 

Silver Dollar Concealer Interior

A view of the inside of the silver dollar, which could be used to conceal secret messages or film.

 

CIA ID Card for Allen W. Dulles

 

CIA ID Card for Allen W. Dulles

Greying hair apparently is a side-effect of being a U.S. president and a CIA director. But Allen W. Dulles earned his over a long career – the longest a CIA director ever served. Dulles joined the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during WWII, during which he directed intelligence operations from Switzerland. In 1951, he joined the newly created Central Intelligence Agency and became its director in 1953. He retired in 1961.

 

Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife

 

Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife

Introduced in 1941, the knife is named after its British designers, Captains W.E. Fairbairn and E.A. Sykes. Here pictured with its sheath (at left), the weapon was crafted to strike at the most vulnerable parts of an opponent’s body.

 

Minox Camera

 

Minox Camera

Walter Zapp, a Latvian engineer, developed a portable camera in 1937 that would fit easily into the palm of a hand and take high-quality pictures. Originally made from steel in Riga, it was considered a marvel of technology and became the world’s most widely used spy camera.

 

Seismic Intruder Detection Device

 

Seismic Intruder Detection Device

This Cold War-Era intrusion-detection system was designed to blend in with the terrain and could detect movement of people, animals or objects up to 300 meters away. The device operated on tiny power cells and had a built-in antenna. Its transmitter would relay data from the device by means of coded pulses.

 

Tire Spike

 

Tire Spike

No matter how the caltrop tire spike was tossed on a roadway or airport runway, it would land with a tire-puncturing prong facing upward.

 

Tobacco Pouch Camera

 

Tobacco Pouch Camera

A miniature 35mm film camera manufactured in Switzerland was concealed in this modified tobacco pouch. A spring-wound mechanism advanced the film between exposures.

Gentlemen’s Spy Set

Kiss of Death

Every good spy story needs a sequel.

Last month, we published a gallery of CIA spy tools that was so popular, we decided to publish a follow-up with more gear.

We’ve expanded the rogue’s gallery of ingenious spy gadgets with a raft of devious tricks from the former Soviet bloc and other countries, including a lipstick gun, shoe bug and a seriously savage rectal Houdini kit (you’ll understand it when you see the pic). We hope you like these as much as you liked the others. All images are courtesy of the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C.

Above:

Kiss of Death

For the spy-op gone bad, or simply for any Natscha who found herself out to dinner with the date from hell, this Cold War-era KGB lipstick gun delivered the kiss of death with a single 4.5mm shot.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Button Cam

Button Cam

Ajax was the codename for this hidden coat camera issued by the KGB around 1970. The lens was embedded in the double-breasted jacket’s right middle button.

To snap a surreptitious picture, the spy would squeeze a shutter cable hidden in the coat pocket, triggering the fake button to open for the lens. This was one of several models of buttonhole cameras widely used in the Soviet Union, Europe and North America.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Spy Umbrella

Spy Umbrella

Perfect for a mad Mary Poppins or a gentleman assassin, this KGB-issued umbrella could retard rain or fire a poison pellet. A similar device was used to kill Bulgarian dissident writer Georgi Markov on the streets of London in 1978.

Markov was waiting for a bus to go to work when he felt a sting on the back of one leg and turned to see a man lifting an umbrella from the ground. He died three days later of poisoning from ricin. An autopsy uncovered a pellet the size of a pinhead embedded in his leg.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Seriously Savage Rectal Houdini Kit

Seriously Savage Rectal Houdini Kit

It’s a toss-up which would be worse, getting caught by the enemy or having the cap on this rectal escape kit pop off unexpectedly in a spy’s caboose. The kit was issued by the CIA in the 1960s.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Cyanide Specs

Cyanide Specs

Choosing death over torture, a captured spy in the 1970s could chew on the tip of these CIA-issued spectacles to get at a cyanide pellet hidden inside.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Cyanide Gas Gun

Cyanide Gas Gun

A gas gun similar to this one was used by KGB officer Bogdan Stashinsky to assassinate two Ukrainian dissidents — Lev Rebet and Stepan Bandera — in Germany in 1957 and 1959.

The gun, which Stashinsky concealed in a rolled-up newspaper, exploded hydrogen from a crushed cyanide capsule into the victim’s face, causing him to go into cardiac arrest.

Stashinsky later defected to Germany and confessed to the crimes.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Shoe Bug

Shoe Bug

Spy games weren’t just for the big superpowers. This shoe transmitter was used by the Romanian Secret Service, or Securitate, in the 1960s to 1970s to spy on American diplomats.

Diplomats, reluctant to purchase clothing locally, would have dapper shoes flown in. The spy agency would intercept the shoes at the post office and install a bug and transmitter in the heel to monitor the diplomat’s conversations. The transmitter wouldn’t be detected during an electronic sweep of the diplomat’s office for bugs unless the diplomat was in the room at the time the sweep occurred.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Turd Transmitter

Turd Transmitter

This CIA turd transmitter, issued around 1970, was actually a homing beacon that transmitted a radio signal to pilots overhead to help direct them to bombing targets and reconnaissance sites.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Pipe Pistol

Pipe Pistol

Issued by British Special Forces during World War II, this pipe could fire a small projectile designed to kill a person at close range. The weapon fired by twisting the bowl while holding the stem.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Steineck Watchcam

Steineck Watchcam

This Steineck watchcam, a product of post-World War II Germany, allowed an agent to snap pics while appearing to check the time — no easy feat since there was no viewfinder on the device. The film disk, about an inch across, could produce eight exposures.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Tree Stump Bug

Tree Stump Bug

In the early 1970s, U.S. intelligence agents concealed a bug in an artificial stump and planted it in a wooded area outside Moscow to eavesdrop on radar and communications signals of a Soviet missile system.

The intercepted signals were stored and then transmitted to a satellite passing overhead, then passed to a ground site in the United States. The top of the stump appeared to observers to be opaque, but was actually transparent so that sunlight could filter through and charge the device’s solar batteries.

The KGB eventually discovered the bug.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Fountain Pen Camera

Fountain Pen Camera

When even a pocket camera was too conspicuous, this fountain pen camera did the trick. Issued by the CIA in the late 1970s, this fountain pen was one of three different designs created to conceal a Tropel lens. The others included a key chain and a cigarette lighter.

Designed specifically for photographing documents, devices like this were used by Aleksandr Ogorodnik, codenamed Trigon, who was a senior Soviet diplomat recruited by the CIA in the 1970s. Ogorodnik passed on hundreds of classified documents to the U.S. before he was caught by the KGB. He committed suicide using a poison pill from the CIA before the KGB was able to force him to sign a confession.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Coin Cache

Coin Cache

Issued by the KGB beginning in the 1950s, this hollow coin could conceal microfilm and microdots. It was opened by inserting a needle into a tiny hole in the front of the coin.

Photo: Courtesy of the International Spy Museum

Coal Bomb and Camouflage Kit

Coal Bomb and Camouflage Kit

This lump of coal, issued in the 1940s by the Office of Special Services, precursor to the CIA, concealed explosives that, when shoveled into a boiler fire, would explode.

The accompanying camouflage kit allowed an agent to paint the coal the same color as local coal in order to blend in.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Glove Pistol

Glove Pistol

Issued by the U.S. Navy during World War II, this pistol allowed an operative to take out the enemy without ever removing his gloves. To fire the pistol, the wearer simply pushed the plunger against the victim’s body.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Canteen Bomb

Canteen Bomb

This World War II-era canteen from U.S. Army intelligence concealed explosives that could be used by resistance groups to sabotage encampments behind enemy lines.

Photo: Courtesy of the International Spy Museum

Pigeon Spy Cam

Pigeon Spy Cam

Cameras were used widely to photograph troops and fortifications for the first time in World War I, allowing spies to study enemy weapons and generate topographical maps.

But how to get a camera into enemy territory without endangering the life of a pilot? Enter patriotic pigeons outfitted with tiny cameras that could swoop over military sites and snap photographs without being noticed.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Cufflink Cache

Cufflink Cache

Issued by the KGB in the 1950s, the hollowed base of these cufflinks could be used to smuggle microdot film across a border.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Smoking Kills

Smoking Kills

The Surgeon General was right. Smoking can be hazardous to your health. Particularly when it involves this pack of smokes issued by the KGB in the 1950s, which in reality was an assassination tool.

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

Fly Button Compass

Fly Button Compass

This button compass, sewn onto the fly of a pair of pants, could help a spy navigate his way to a border. The face of the compass spun on a pin to indicate north (the two dots) or south (one dot).

Photo: Courtesy International Spy Museum

 

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